Let my enemies take care

Now there’s iron in my soul.
Iron in my tongue, too,
clapping against the skull.

scavengedluxury:

Horizon Building stairs. Nottingham, March 2014.

scavengedluxury:

Horizon Building stairs. Nottingham, March 2014.

(via dreamscapesontape)

(Source: cardboard-crack, via playsetsapp)

(Source: suprchnk, via nocrimeinthewasteland)

ignorantiajurisnonexcusat:

When comic book lawyer Matt Murdock couldn’t appear in court due to speculation that he was the blind, acrobatic superhero Daredevil, he came up with an alternative plan: coaching his clients to represent themselves in court. Now a Melbourne law firm has set up a similar scheme: “offering ‘court coaching’ for a lower fee to those unable to afford, or who do not want, full legal representationThis involves a one-hour conversation with [a barrister] who gives clients tips on how to present themselves and their arguments in court.” The new service reflects a developing trend in Victorian courts; the County Court has established a dedicated coordinator to assist self-represented litigants, and the Supreme Court says they make up “about 20 per cent of all [civil] litigants, compared with 3 per cent of people facing criminal charges”.

Don’t patronise me Tumblr

(Source: bluntclips, via tumblerofarmagnac)

mindlessmunkey:

Those Aussie Things: Iced VoVos

Beware the infinitely inferior Strawberry Mallow, hidden amongst those Iced VoVos!

Iced Vovos are like rejects from the Strawberry Mallow factory, steamrolled flat and with the texture of plasterboard. Ugh.

(Source: thoseaussiethings)

nakamagome2:

Vertigo by Yannis Prappas

nakamagome2:

Vertigo by Yannis Prappas

(via hiddenmoth)

wehadfacesthen:

Aircraft spotter, London, 1943

wehadfacesthen:

Aircraft spotter, London, 1943

(via littleorangesuitcase)

(Source: citizendev, via matchtricks)


How many notes in a saxophone?
How many tears in a bottle of gin?

(Source: shimmer)

oupacademic:

Mercator’s World Map, 1569. On twenty-one separate sheets of paper, Gerhard Mercator (1512-1594) printed an entire map of the world. For decades, ocean pilots had complained that they were unable to plot their course at sea directly across a flat chart. Mercator’s map was the first to permit navigators to draw their route as a straight line. A variation of Mercator’s map continues to be used today.
From The Oxford Map Companion: One Hundred Sources in World History by Professor Patricia Seed, which illustrates how peoples and cultures throughout the human past have imagined their worlds through a diverse collection of historical maps from the Paleolithic to the present.

“Because, CJ, the Mercator projection has fostered European imperialist attitudes for centuries and created an ethnic bias against the Third World.”

oupacademic:

Mercator’s World Map, 1569. On twenty-one separate sheets of paper, Gerhard Mercator (1512-1594) printed an entire map of the world. For decades, ocean pilots had complained that they were unable to plot their course at sea directly across a flat chart. Mercator’s map was the first to permit navigators to draw their route as a straight line. A variation of Mercator’s map continues to be used today.

From The Oxford Map Companion: One Hundred Sources in World History by Professor Patricia Seed, which illustrates how peoples and cultures throughout the human past have imagined their worlds through a diverse collection of historical maps from the Paleolithic to the present.

Because, CJ, the Mercator projection has fostered European imperialist attitudes for centuries and created an ethnic bias against the Third World.”

(via nocrimeinthewasteland)